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Eagle Country

This website contains the story behind the world’s best ” interceptor” and “strike” fighter. There are numerous great site’s about the F-15 so why another site?

Well most site are great photo gallery’s and contain the history and development of the F-15. What they miss is the story behind the F-15. The training, exercises and operations, deployments, Squadron anecdotes, personal stories. The history of the squadrons that operate or haven flown with the F-15. News about current exercises and deployments.

Each squadron history page is different from the other. Such as the 461st TFTS which contains a whole lot of extra information about the development of the F-15E training program. Or the 22nd TFS Stingers with a lot of squadron anecdotes and fighter pilot pranks. Take a look for yourself, and I hope you enjoy it. Thank you for visiting skytrailer.nl

Eagle Country is a site that is far from complete any contributions, suggestions are welcome. If you would like to share your squadron stories, photos, info etc please contact the webmaster contact@skytrailer.nl

Eagle Country on Facebook

To all Eagle Drivers, Strike Drivers, Strike Eagle WSO’s and Eagle Keepers. Eagle Country Facebook group is a great group to share squadron photos, anecdotes, bar stories etc from you time serving in one of the Eagle squadrons. Keeping the rich Eagle heritage alive. Feel free to join and maybe come across some squadron mates with who you have lost contact. Feel free to post any photos, stories etc. Join and click on this link Eagle Country

Below the latest F-15 Eagle News

Click on each headline for the full story and large images

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104th Fighter Wing in Action

F-15C Eagles take off as part of a training exercise Nov. 4, 2022, at Barnes Air National Guard Base, Massachusetts. The 104th Fighter Wing is trained to provide around-the-clock Aerospace Control Alert, providing armed F-15 fighters ready to scramble in a moment’s notice to protect the northeast United States from any airborne threat. (U.S. Air National Guard photo illustration by Randy Burlingame)
F-15C Eagles take off as part of a training exercise Nov. 4, 2022, at Barnes Air National Guard Base, Massachusetts. The 104th Fighter Wing is trained to provide around-the-clock Aerospace Control Alert, providing armed F-15 fighters ready to scramble in a moment’s notice to protect the northeast United States from any airborne threat. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Randy Burlingame)
F-15C Eagles take off as part of a training exercise Nov. 4, 2022, at Barnes Air National Guard Base, Massachusetts. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Randy Burlingame)
F-15C Eagles take off as part of a training exercise Nov. 4, 2022, at Barnes Air National Guard Base, Massachusetts. (U.S. Air National Guard photo by Randy Burlingame)
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48th Fighter Wing Night Ops

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Brig. Gen David Eaglin visiting Exercise Keen Sword 23

U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. David Eaglin, 18th Wing commander, greets Airman 1st Class Catherine McManamon, 372nd Training Squadron crew chief, at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Nov. 17, 2022. McManamon launched Eaglin in support of Exercise Keen Sword 23. Exercises like Keen Sword allow Japan Self-Defense Forces and U.S. military forces to work together across a variety of areas to enhance interoperability and readiness. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexis Redin)
U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. David Eaglin, 18th Wing commander, inspects an F-15C Eagle prior to his flight at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Nov. 17, 2022. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexis Redin)
U.S. Air Force Brig. Gen. David Eaglin, 18th wing commander, smiles as he performs pre-flight checks on an F-15C Eagle at Kadena Air Base, Japan, Nov. 17, 2022. (U.S. Air Force photo by Airman 1st Class Alexis Redin)
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Gunfighter lead wing executes ACE ops

By Staff Sgt. Benjamin Ingold

MOUNTAIN HOME AIR FORCE BASE, Idaho —
The 366th Fighter Wing lead wing force elements conducted exercise Double Barrel 23-1 Oct. 17-21.

Airmen assigned to the 366th Fighter Wing refuel an F-15E Strike Eagle at Gowen Field, Boise, Idaho, Oct. 18, 2022. The Airmen used a Mountain Home Air Force Base fuel truck transported to Gowen Field on a 62nd Airlift Wing C-17 Globemaster III. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Benjamin Ingold)

Lead Wing exercises are named based on the level of integration between the airbase squadron, command and control element, and the mission generation force element. A single component exercise is known as a pistol. double barrel combines two components and all three operating in unison is a cannon.

U.S. Air Force Airmen assigned to the 366th Fighter Wing fly an F-15E Strike Eagle over Gowen Field, Boise, Idaho, Oct. 18, 2022. The Strike Eagle is a dual capable aircraft able to employ air to air and air to ground weaponry. (U.S. Air Force photo by Staff Sgt. Benjamin Ingold)
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Veterans Day 2022

In 1921, an unknown World War I American soldier was buried in Arlington National Cemetery. This site, on a hillside overlooking the Potomac River and the city of Washington, D.C., became the focal point of reverence for America’s veterans. Similar ceremonies occurred earlier in England and France, where an unknown soldier was buried in each nation’s highest place of honor. These memorial gestures all took place on November 11, giving universal recognition to the celebrated ending of World War I fighting at 11 a.m., November 11, 1918. The day became known as Armistice Day.


Armistice Day officially received its name in the United States of America in 1926 through a Congressional resolution. It became a national holiday 12 years later by similar Congressional action. World War I was hoped to be “the War to end all wars.” If that had been the case, November 11 might still be called Armistice Day. But only a few years after the holiday was proclaimed, war broke out in Europe.


The first celebration using the term Veterans Day occurred in Birmingham, Alabama, in 1947. Raymond Weeks, a World War II veteran, organized “National Veterans Day,” which included a parade and other festivities, to honor all veterans. The event was held on November 11, then designated Armistice Day. Later, U.S. Representative Edward Rees of Kansas proposed a bill that would change Armistice Day to Veterans Day. In 1954, Congress passed the bill that President Eisenhower signed proclaiming November 11 as Veterans Day.


In America’s wars following WWI, millions have fought and hundreds of thousands have given the ultimate sacrifice for this country, for our freedom. In WWII, 16.1 million Americans fought and 405,399 died. In the Korean War, 1.8 million Americans fought and 36,516 died. In the Vietnam War, 3.4 million Americans fought and 58,209 died. In Desert Shield/Desert Storm, 694,000 Americans fought and 258 died. In the ongoing War on Terror, 7,075 Americans have given their lives.
Today we honor all who have served and remember those who gave all to preserve our freedom. Thank you Veterans